Tag Archives: chalk paint

Chalk Paint Mix for Front Door Redo

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Chalk Paint Mix for Front Door Redo

Everyone says that first impressions are lasting, right?  Well, if you’d driven by my house before, I don’t think you would have remembered anything about it.  Everything about the front porch is blah.  Ours features a concrete slab to sit on, grey siding, and a white door. Definitely had little curb appeal.White front door

I have tried to add color by the cushions on the furniture, but that only goes so far. I have wanted to paint the front door now for a while, and I always knew it would be yellow. With the grey siding we have, I figured the yellow would go great, and provide a pop of color. The hard part was deciding which yellow.

I finally read a tip about mixing two colors of Annie Sloan chalk paint, Arles and English Yellow, to create a nice soft yellow. Ultimately, I decided to go with this tip, because I didn’t have to do any prep work with the door that way. I bought one of each color, in the sample jar size, and used an old coffee canister to mix the two colors together.Annie Sloan Chalk paintArles and English yellow mixed

I started painting, and did the inside trays first. The first coat went on really fast, and I used a brush to edge around the doorknob. In this picture, it was night, and so I was pretty excited about the color. First coat

However, the next morning, in the light of day, the yellow seemed overly bright.  It was like the two photos had two different colors.  It wasn’t the color I was wanting, and I knew I wouldn’t be happy with it. Too yellow

I was panicking a bit because chalk paint is expensive, the nearest store that sells Annie Sloan is 45 minutes away, and I didn’t want to feel like I was wasting the paint.  Finally, I thought about adding some white paint to the mixture, just to tone it down a bit.  I had an almost full bottle of Wicker White acrylic paint, so I added that to the paint, a little at a time, until I felt I had the right color. I ended up using the entire amount that was in the bottle.  I figured that if adding the acrylic to the chalk paint ruined it in any way, then I would just have to start over with new paint, which I was going to have to do anyway.Add Acrylic white

I got to painting the second coat on, with the new paint color. Even as I was brushing it on, I could tell that I was going to like this color. I also did it during the day, so that I could really tell what it would be like. Second coat with whicker white

And here is the door with the second coat on.  Much improved, and more what I was wanting. Whew!  I didn’t notice any problems with adding the acrylic to the chalk paint, as it was being brushed on, or drying. It still had that chalky finish to the touch.finished second coat

For the final coat, I didn’t use wax, like most would.  Since this is the door that gets the most use in our house, I wanted something durable for the sealer.  Also, it gets super hot here in the summer, and didn’t want the wax damaged from the heat. I decided on a clear semi gloss Spar Urethane.  top coat sealer

And here is the sheen the semi gloss provided on the door.  It is very nice, and went on well over the chalk paint. I ended up doing two coats of this as well. Let’s hope it is durable enough to stand up to the wear and tear the front door gets. Sheen to the front door

I have to say I love how it turned out.  I like the pop of color it provides to the front of the house, and I like how the cushions have a bit of yellow to pair with the door. Now, I just have to get rid of that concrete slab. I have ideas for that, but have to wait for now:)chalk painted front door

Thanks for looking!

Sarah

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Creating Craftsman Style Crown Molding for Kitchen Remodel

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Creating Craftsman Style Crown Molding for Kitchen Remodel

When we started the kitchen makeover, I knew that once we got the scalloped wood trim down from over the sink, the cabinets would be a blank slate at the top.  When Double D measured from the ceiling to the top of the doors, there was almost six inches we could use to create some wonderful crown molding.

This is what we started with.  Yes, I didn’t paint the cabinets all the way to the ceiling.  This is what happens when you think you are running low on your expensive chalk paint:)  Unfortunately, I did have to end up buying another can for the crown molding and cornices, so I probably should have just painted them all the way to the ceiling.  Since the kitchen is laid out in an L shape, these pictures are of the cabinets to the left, and to the right, of the sink.Cabinets before crown moldingSouth cabinets before

To be honest, we used crown molding in our basement, and we knew from that experience that mitering wasn’t our forte.  To make it easy on ourselves, I scoured the internet for ideas to do something different, and I came across the Craftsman style options. It really was something I should have thought about to begin with, since our main light fixture and cabinet doors mimicked that style to begin with. We came up with an idea based on the pictures, and even created a short piece out of scrap wood to see it we would like it.

Since we liked the example piece, we went ahead and purchased some paint grade pine boards, and Double D got to measuring.  We had three long pieces for the fronts of the two sets of cabinets, and three short sets for the ends. Once they were cut, I painted them with the Annie Sloan chalk paint in French Linen, and sealed them with the same floor sealer I used on the cabinets.Crown molding painted

Once the pieces were dry, we could start creating each section.  To start, we clamped the 1×3 over the 1×4 to make an L shape.  Then we drilled holes into the top of the 1×3, into the 1×4, so we could then add screws to hold them together. These screws would then be hidden at the back, towards the ceiling.Crown molding started

Then we hung the L shaped molding at the top of the cabinets with screws that were put in right under the  joint.L shape crown molding going up

And we did the same thing for the short sides of the cabinets.short sides above sink

And finally the other two front pieces.Front side of crown molding

Finally, we were ready to add our final layer, which was a 1×2.  This gave the crown molding another dimension, and served to cover up the screws from where the L shape was hung. We attached the 1x2s with finish nails.Putting the crown molding togetherCrown molding

I didn’t get any pictures of the next step. Once everything was hung, I used wood putty to cover the nail holes, and the joints that were visible on the ends. Then I sanded those, and repainted and sealed them.

And here is the finished product.  When we made the example, I was worried that the crown molding might overpower the cabinets. In the end, I think the crown molding fits right in with the rest of the kitchen, and has become one of my favorite features.  The best part is that this was relatively easy, and much less expensive than if we’d gone with regular crown molding.crown molding on the east sidefinished crown molding

Here’s a before and after of the whole kitchen. Quite a difference!Before and after of L shape

Thanks for looking!

Sarah

For more information on our kitchen revamp, see also:

Wood Cornices Built for Revamped Kitchen

Using Perforated Metal for a Kitchen Backsplash

Kitchen Makeover on a Modest Budget

Tired Cabinets get a Facelift with Chalk Paint

Linking up to Between Naps on the Porch, Domestically Speaking, A Stroll Thru Life, and Home Stories A-Z:

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Wood Cornices Built for Revamped Kitchen

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Wood Cornices Built for Revamped Kitchen

When we bought the house, the original owners left their fabric valances on the sink window, and the double window in the dining room.  They had wine bottles on them, and were cute, but just didn’t fit in with our kitchen makeover. I knew I wanted something architectural to go with the new crown molding, so this is what we came up with.

I loved the idea of having a shelf incorporated into the cornices, so I drew up a picture to show Double D. We finally decided that it should stick out three inches from the wall to allow room for the mini blinds, and hang down at least six inches to cover the mini blinds when they are up. Since we only have them down in the summer, I wanted them hidden the rest of the year. We purchased the paint grade cedar, just like with the crown molding, and Double D got to measuring.

Here is the first one taking shape.  Since this one was going to be sandwiched between the two cabinets, it didn’t need a cover piece on each end.Building cornice

To mimic the crown molding, we added a 1″x2″ board to the front. The 2″x4″ piece is what we hung the entire piece from, and also provided that 3″ spacer away from the wall.  More on that in a moment. This picture is of it laying down.Cornice for over sink

After they both were built, I got to paint them with Annie Sloan’s chalk paint in French Linen, and seal the paint with the floor sealer we used for the cabinets.Cornice painted with French linen

Once they dried, it was time to hang them.  Double D attached L shaped brackets to the wall that we had left over from an IKEA project.L Bracket

We wedged the cornice in between the two cabinets, and rested the 2″x4″ onto the L bracket. From there, we were able to put a screw into the cornice to hold it. Obviously we hadn’t put the screw in yet, in this picture:)Hanging cornice

We did the same thing to the one along the dining room windows.  The only difference on this one is that there are end pieces on each side to give it a finished look, since it is not in between anything.Hanging cornices

And here it is hung up to cover the mini blinds.Cornice over Dining room window

Since it was much longer than the other one, it didn’t seem as sturdy, with only two screws holding it up.  Double D fixed that by adding another L bracket in the middle at the top.  Now it doesn’t seem like it is going to fall over.L bracket for cornice

And here they are finished and decorated.  Since there isn’t a lot of wall space in the kitchen, I’ve never really been able to decorate. I love that I can change the items on the shelves, and decorate for holidays now. I got those cute kitchen prints from The 36th Avenue as part of a free printable.Kitchen window cornice doneDining room cornice done

Who doesn’t love a good before and after?  It’s hard to believe it’s the same area.  I love how the cornice opens the window up more, and how it goes with the crown molding. The only thing I would have done differently is to use a 1″x8″ for the bottom board, just to make sure the mini blinds were covered a bit more.  Other than that, I’m happy with how they turned out:)Cornices before and after

Thanks for looking!

Sarah

For more information on our kitchen revamp, see also:

Creating Craftsman Style Crown Molding for Kitchen Remodel

Using Perforated Metal for a Kitchen Backsplash

Kitchen Makeover on a Modest Budget

Tired Cabinets get a Facelift with Chalk Paint

Linking up with Between Naps on the Porch, Domestically Speaking, A Stroll Thru Life, and Home Stories A-Z:

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