Category Archives: Kitchen Renovation

Spice Tins Moved to the Wall

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Spice Tins Moved to the Wall

After my huge kitchen revamp, I haven’t felt like doing a lot of creative stuff here lately.  However, I have done one more update to the kitchen, even though I said I was done, and that is moving my spice tins to the wall.  I stumbled across the idea on Pinterest, and knew since I had the metal backsplash, it was something I could do easily.  If I hadn’t had a metal backsplash, I think the ideas I have seen of using old cookie sheets, or the side of the fridge would have been really cool.

I started out with a spinner rack that Double D and I received for our wedding 15 years ago.  It had been useful, and something I did like, but I had outgrown it and it was taking up space on my counter. The hardest part was getting my spices rounded up. First spice rack

I went ahead and ordered 36 tins from the Specialty Bottle company.  Once I got them, I washed the tins, and let them dry. These are food safe, whereas the watch part tins that I was originally looking at are not.  Evidently the two options I researched are different types of metal, but I definitely wanted food safe ones. In my researching, I found these were the least expensive option for the amount I needed, but you can find the tins at the big name stores, and some even have the magnets already on them.Spice tins

The next step was gluing the rare earth magnets that I purchased from Harbor Freight onto the tins.  These magnets are super strong, so they come in a protective bottle.  I wasn’t aware of how strong until I tried to pull them apart.  I used GOOP to bond the magnets to the tins, and let the glue dry overnight.Rare earth magnets for spice tinsGlue magnets on

The next evening, I used my square punch to cut out 72 pieces from my black chalkboard contact paper.  The window on the tin was big enough so that I would be able to put two squares on each tin. Black contact paper square punch

I used a silver permanent marker to write the name of the spice, and then filled the tin with the spice. These tins are big enough to accommodate the regular size bottles of spices. I only had one full bottle, and while it did fill it to the brim, everything ended up fitting.Filling the tin

I pushed in the sides of the lid a bit to create a tighter fit, and was finally able to start putting them on the wall. I haven’t had any issues with the lids coming off. Spice tins on wall

I only ended up using the tins for the savory spices, and used 28 of the 36 for the wall.  I did use an additional two for some of my baking spices, and I have 6 left in case I get some new ones. Spice tins alphabetized

And here is the finished result, with the spices within reach of the cooking area. I do have a basket of spices that wouldn’t fit in tins, like the bay leaves, chili powder, and some sea salt grinders. However, I really like that the majority of them are up off the counter, freeing up space for prep work.Spice tins on the wall

Overall I really like how it turned out.  I don’t have any problem getting the spices out, I just use a measuring spoon.  However, the thing I have found it that I typically have dirty hands when I reach for them, so I do have to wipe them off after use. Also, I have heard some people say spices shouldn’t be exposed to light or heat, because it lessens their flavor.  I figure they were in see-through glass jars before this, and even closer to the stove than they are now.  I also use mine up fairly fast, so I guess I’m not too worried about it.

Thanks for looking!

Sarah

Linking up to Between Naps on the Porch, A Stroll Thru Life, Domestically Speaking and Dishing It & Digging It:

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Creating Craftsman Style Crown Molding for Kitchen Remodel

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Creating Craftsman Style Crown Molding for Kitchen Remodel

When we started the kitchen makeover, I knew that once we got the scalloped wood trim down from over the sink, the cabinets would be a blank slate at the top.  When Double D measured from the ceiling to the top of the doors, there was almost six inches we could use to create some wonderful crown molding.

This is what we started with.  Yes, I didn’t paint the cabinets all the way to the ceiling.  This is what happens when you think you are running low on your expensive chalk paint:)  Unfortunately, I did have to end up buying another can for the crown molding and cornices, so I probably should have just painted them all the way to the ceiling.  Since the kitchen is laid out in an L shape, these pictures are of the cabinets to the left, and to the right, of the sink.Cabinets before crown moldingSouth cabinets before

To be honest, we used crown molding in our basement, and we knew from that experience that mitering wasn’t our forte.  To make it easy on ourselves, I scoured the internet for ideas to do something different, and I came across the Craftsman style options. It really was something I should have thought about to begin with, since our main light fixture and cabinet doors mimicked that style to begin with. We came up with an idea based on the pictures, and even created a short piece out of scrap wood to see it we would like it.

Since we liked the example piece, we went ahead and purchased some paint grade pine boards, and Double D got to measuring.  We had three long pieces for the fronts of the two sets of cabinets, and three short sets for the ends. Once they were cut, I painted them with the Annie Sloan chalk paint in French Linen, and sealed them with the same floor sealer I used on the cabinets.Crown molding painted

Once the pieces were dry, we could start creating each section.  To start, we clamped the 1×3 over the 1×4 to make an L shape.  Then we drilled holes into the top of the 1×3, into the 1×4, so we could then add screws to hold them together. These screws would then be hidden at the back, towards the ceiling.Crown molding started

Then we hung the L shaped molding at the top of the cabinets with screws that were put in right under the  joint.L shape crown molding going up

And we did the same thing for the short sides of the cabinets.short sides above sink

And finally the other two front pieces.Front side of crown molding

Finally, we were ready to add our final layer, which was a 1×2.  This gave the crown molding another dimension, and served to cover up the screws from where the L shape was hung. We attached the 1x2s with finish nails.Putting the crown molding togetherCrown molding

I didn’t get any pictures of the next step. Once everything was hung, I used wood putty to cover the nail holes, and the joints that were visible on the ends. Then I sanded those, and repainted and sealed them.

And here is the finished product.  When we made the example, I was worried that the crown molding might overpower the cabinets. In the end, I think the crown molding fits right in with the rest of the kitchen, and has become one of my favorite features.  The best part is that this was relatively easy, and much less expensive than if we’d gone with regular crown molding.crown molding on the east sidefinished crown molding

Here’s a before and after of the whole kitchen. Quite a difference!Before and after of L shape

Thanks for looking!

Sarah

For more information on our kitchen revamp, see also:

Wood Cornices Built for Revamped Kitchen

Using Perforated Metal for a Kitchen Backsplash

Kitchen Makeover on a Modest Budget

Tired Cabinets get a Facelift with Chalk Paint

Linking up to Between Naps on the Porch, Domestically Speaking, A Stroll Thru Life, and Home Stories A-Z:

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Wood Cornices Built for Revamped Kitchen

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Wood Cornices Built for Revamped Kitchen

When we bought the house, the original owners left their fabric valances on the sink window, and the double window in the dining room.  They had wine bottles on them, and were cute, but just didn’t fit in with our kitchen makeover. I knew I wanted something architectural to go with the new crown molding, so this is what we came up with.

I loved the idea of having a shelf incorporated into the cornices, so I drew up a picture to show Double D. We finally decided that it should stick out three inches from the wall to allow room for the mini blinds, and hang down at least six inches to cover the mini blinds when they are up. Since we only have them down in the summer, I wanted them hidden the rest of the year. We purchased the paint grade cedar, just like with the crown molding, and Double D got to measuring.

Here is the first one taking shape.  Since this one was going to be sandwiched between the two cabinets, it didn’t need a cover piece on each end.Building cornice

To mimic the crown molding, we added a 1″x2″ board to the front. The 2″x4″ piece is what we hung the entire piece from, and also provided that 3″ spacer away from the wall.  More on that in a moment. This picture is of it laying down.Cornice for over sink

After they both were built, I got to paint them with Annie Sloan’s chalk paint in French Linen, and seal the paint with the floor sealer we used for the cabinets.Cornice painted with French linen

Once they dried, it was time to hang them.  Double D attached L shaped brackets to the wall that we had left over from an IKEA project.L Bracket

We wedged the cornice in between the two cabinets, and rested the 2″x4″ onto the L bracket. From there, we were able to put a screw into the cornice to hold it. Obviously we hadn’t put the screw in yet, in this picture:)Hanging cornice

We did the same thing to the one along the dining room windows.  The only difference on this one is that there are end pieces on each side to give it a finished look, since it is not in between anything.Hanging cornices

And here it is hung up to cover the mini blinds.Cornice over Dining room window

Since it was much longer than the other one, it didn’t seem as sturdy, with only two screws holding it up.  Double D fixed that by adding another L bracket in the middle at the top.  Now it doesn’t seem like it is going to fall over.L bracket for cornice

And here they are finished and decorated.  Since there isn’t a lot of wall space in the kitchen, I’ve never really been able to decorate. I love that I can change the items on the shelves, and decorate for holidays now. I got those cute kitchen prints from The 36th Avenue as part of a free printable.Kitchen window cornice doneDining room cornice done

Who doesn’t love a good before and after?  It’s hard to believe it’s the same area.  I love how the cornice opens the window up more, and how it goes with the crown molding. The only thing I would have done differently is to use a 1″x8″ for the bottom board, just to make sure the mini blinds were covered a bit more.  Other than that, I’m happy with how they turned out:)Cornices before and after

Thanks for looking!

Sarah

For more information on our kitchen revamp, see also:

Creating Craftsman Style Crown Molding for Kitchen Remodel

Using Perforated Metal for a Kitchen Backsplash

Kitchen Makeover on a Modest Budget

Tired Cabinets get a Facelift with Chalk Paint

Linking up with Between Naps on the Porch, Domestically Speaking, A Stroll Thru Life, and Home Stories A-Z:

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