Bathroom Remodel: Part 5, DIY Exposed Conduit Light Fixture

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Bathroom Remodel: Part 5, DIY Exposed Conduit Light Fixture

Be forewarned…this post is a long one!

So our light situation in the bathroom went from the 1980s “Hollywood” strip light fixture to industrial.  I was more than ready to get rid of that thing. However, what I did really like about it was the amount of light it provided, since it had six bulbs.  We also had a globe light over the toilet, so that brought it up to seven total.

Hollywood strip light

I knew I wanted to keep the same amount of light bulbs, since we had spent some money changing all of them over to LED bulbs last year. The question was how were we going to be able to do that.

I was eating my lunch in the basement of where I work one day, and realized that I really liked the lighting that was down there. This is what I was inspired by.  I started looking for other ideas on Pinterest and loved what I was seeing for exposed conduit lighting.  There’s some really cool stuff out there!Pipe lights at the capitol

I got busy, and started drawing ideas up for what I wanted (BTW, an artist, I am not, so don’t laugh).  I knew we could used the electrical box that was already over the toilet, and I knew I wanted to use all seven bulbs. proposed light drawing

Then we used fabric strips to lay it out on the floor, and for our electrician friend, Jimmy, to look at, since he would be installing it. You’ll have to excuse the mess, as it was in the middle of construction. The layout did change a couple of times until we came up with something we thought would work the best. mock up of light using fabric

After we met at Lowes to get all the parts, we came back home and created a diagram, complete with conduit length measurements. Really, the only requirement that I had was that I wanted one bulb to be in the middle of the mirror when it was done. We did decide the main trunk of the conduit should be bigger to accommodate the four cords that would be at the one end, so we got 1″ conduit for that section, and two octagonal boxes with a 2″ depth.Diagram for finished light

From there we were able to start putting it together.  Jimmy brought his compact band saw, and we laid out the items we needed.Band saw to cut conduit

Once the conduit was cut to the lengths on the diagram, they started assembling the fixture.Connectors, boxes, conduit

Double D and Jimmy knocked out the metal tabs where the connectors would be for each conduit pipe, attached them to the boxes, and then connected the conduit. The boxes are used for multiple conductor runs that are split into two or more directions to bring power to a number of lights, in this case.Electrical boxes and connectors

We got the main trunk line assembled and connected the other parts. The last thing Jimmy did was to use a conduit bender to create a dip for one piece of the conduit to cross the main trunk line. For this piece, we also had to have two elbows to create corners. Conduit cut and put together

To start painting, we followed the advice of Jimmy, and wiped down all of the pieces with denatured alcohol to get any coating off of the conduit.  That way, we hoped the paint would stick well. I then sprayed all of the pieces with Rustoleum’s primer, including the hangers, box covers, and nuts and bolts. I let that sit for a couple of days, and didn’t notice any primer peeling away, or cracking. Primer coat for EMT

I then gave everything a couple of coats of Rustoleum’s Oil Rubbed Bronze to match the sink legs, and shower fixtures.Rustoleum's Oil Rubbed Bronze

Finally, it was install day.  Jimmy removed the light fixture over the toilet, and used the wire there to start hooking everything up. Once the first part went up, he did reconnect the fixture so they would have some light in the bathroom while they worked.First part of conduit

The guys then screwed the conduit hangers into the ceiling using the larger size for the 1″ conduit in the main trunk line. conduit hangers installed

And started hanging the conduit…11/2

Once the conduit was up they could start with the lights.  We purchased seven Hemma lamp cords from IKEA, to go with the seven Ledare LED bulbs we already had. I’m not an electrician, so I’m not even going to try to explain all of the steps that this involved.  I do know Jimmy and Double D threaded each lamp cord through to leave about 6″ hanging outside of the ends of the conduit. wires being threaded for conduit light

And then somehow connected all seven cords to the main box…wire pulled through for light

And let there be light! Like a lot of light. I knew it would be a different type of light, since it’s directed down now, instead of out from the wall.  You can definitely still see your grey hair and wrinkles though:) Industrial conduit light finished

I did want to show a close up of the bent conduit, and what it ended up looking like.  It was hard to tell how it was going to look while it was laying on the concrete in the garage, but I think it definitely gives the fixture character, and I’m glad we went with it. bent conduit

I love this last picture of it.  I took this by practically laying on the ground under it.  I just love how it turned out, and I can honestly say that this fixture is one of a kind.  One last step I did was spray some ORB in a plastic lid, and touched up the paint on the hardware and pipe, just wherever they dinged it in the process of installing it. I am a bit worried about the conduit rusting from steam condensation, and I want to make sure I do everything I can to hold that off for a while.  Hopefully the paint will help with that!finished light against the ceiling

I have to give big props to Jimmy for being willing to take on one of my crazy ideas, and work with me to get it done. It turned out better than I even thought it would:)

Thanks for hanging in there till the end!

Sarah

Check out the other Bathroom Renovation posts:

Bathroom Remodel: Part 1, Demo

Bathroom Remodel: Part 2, Shower Installation

Bathroom Remodel: Part 3, Drywall and Paint

Bathroom Remodel: Part 4, Luxury Vinyl Tile Flooring 

Linking up with:

Rustic & Refined

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Between Naps on the Porch

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Domestically Speaking

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Bathroom Remodel: Part 4, Luxury Vinyl Tile Flooring

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Bathroom Remodel: Part 4, Luxury Vinyl Tile Flooring

When we first moved in to the house, there was a lovely blue and white linoleum in the bathroom.  We lived with that forever, until in 2013, when we ripped it up, and laid down some peel and stick 12×12″ tiles, in a dark brown stained concrete look.  I actually liked the look of those, but I also knew the brown color wouldn’t fit in this bathroom.  I liked it so much that I tried to get the same look this time around, only in grey. This is what it had looked like, taken on the day we were installing it in 2013.Dark stained concrete look

We started doing demo on the flooring first, and realized that the sticky residue would make it really hard to work in the bathroom.  So we ripped up the underlayment too.  That left us with what we think is the original cream 1970s flooring, which we tried like crazy to get up…before we gave up. That stuff literally was not budging.

We also knew that we wanted to change the position of the toilet.  It was just really awkward the way it was facing, so we cut a hole in the floor to expose the pipes.  We had to have Joe, our plumber, look at it to see if they could be moved to accommodate a different positioning. This took a couple of different saws to accomplish, and Double D had to go through two different layers of plywood to get to where we could see the pipes.  We also didn’t know what we would be cutting into.  Finally, we got it cut out.Cut out hole for toilet pipes

So…Joe came back, looked at the pipes, and said that it would be no problem to move the pipes.  Yay!  He moved them, and left a tall pipe piece sticking out for Double D to cut around when he was measuring for the replacement wood.  Double D installed two new pieces of plywood, and they actually were level with the rest of the flooring. That was one thing we were concerned about. The below picture also shows the drywall ripped out, and the shut off line moved farther down the wall. Toilet pipe finished

Next it was time to start laying the flooring.  We decided to go with a Luxury Vinyl Tile, with an attached pad. Since we had tried to rip up the original floor, and failed, there was a slight height difference and an underlayment pad would be helpful covering that up. We used LVT for the kitchen renovation, and I still really like it one year later.  Adura Max by Mannington had the one we wanted, in a grey weathered concrete look called Carbon, in the Meridian collection. This product is also water resistant, which is really good for bathrooms;)Starting to lay the floor

This flooring has the Lock Solid feature, and literally the planks just snapped together.  I think the actual laying of all of the planks took about an hour. The best part is that you wouldn’t even know that the original floor had been messed with, because you don’t feel it when you walk on the LVT. flooring laid

Next came the trim.  There was no way we could use the trim that originally came with the bathroom, and I didn’t want to have to stain new trim to match the door and window trim. This part was the hardest for us to decide on, until we were talking with our drywall guy, Dave.  I had no idea that they made PVC trim, but it does make sense for decking, etc. After talking with him, we looked at Menards, and found some 1″x3″x8′ pieces that we liked.  They were plain on one side, and wood textured on the other.  I decided to use the plain side, and painted it the same color as the walls.  I really like the effect this creates, since there isn’t a sharp dividing line between the floors and the walls. We could have just used 1x3s in wood too, but this was super easy to paint, and it is water resistant. PVC Trim painted

We used Liquid Nails, and glued each piece to the wall. I figured if we had to take it off at some point, there would just be more trim going up to cover the marks. I also used some caulk to fill in the triangle left in the corner of the trim, once we trimmed out the rounded corner pieces.  I then painted that and it blends perfectly. The only thing I’m not completely sold on is that it does stick out a bit farther than the trim on the door.  We decided to leave that trim the original, since the door casing and door didn’t get painted as well. Finished corner piece caulkedtrim painted and glued

The last piece was the threshold.  This was available with the Adura Max products, and it matches the flooring. It basically just joins the LVT with the carpet that is in the hallway.  Looks good!Piece of flooring for threshold

And here is the finished floor, with the new vent installed.  I love how it looks with the wall color, and the new rug we just got. Don’t mind the gears.  We were using those as weights so that the floor wouldn’t shift while we were laying it. It really feels like this bathroom is finally coming along!Floor completely done

The last thing we did was install the toilet.  I’m including a before and after picture, just because of the difference the repositioning has made.  It just makes that area seem more open and we have a lot more room. I will have to find something fun to hide the water line, because I know the toilet brush holder isn’t it:) Toilet facing out

Thanks for looking!  More bathroom remodel to come, so stay tuned!

Sarah

Check out the other Bathroom Renovation posts:

Bathroom Remodel: Part 1, Demo

Bathroom Remodel: Part 2, Shower Installation

Bathroom Remodel: Part 3, Drywall and Paint

Bathroom Remodel: Part 5, DIY Exposed Conduit Light Fixture

Linking up with:

Rustic & Refined

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Between Naps on the Porch

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Domestically Speaking

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Home Stories A-Z

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A Stroll Thru Life

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Bathroom Remodel: Part 3, Drywall and Paint

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Bathroom Remodel: Part 3, Drywall and Paint

I learned so much on this project as a whole, but a lot of them had to do with the drywall step.  Basically, I found out the difference between the terms drywall, and Sheetrock.  Had no idea, but Sheetrock is the brand name, and drywall is the process. I also was shown what a hot patch is, and how to do it. I found out that rounded corners exist, and turn out looking spectacular. And finally, I learned that you should really take the time to prime new drywall.

Whew!  That being said, we didn’t actually do anything with this step, except for the primering and painting.  We had someone come out and do the drywall, because, well honestly, we suck at it. Hanging it is no problem, but we get into trouble with the mudding part.

With everything that had to be done plumbing and electrical wise in the bathroom, the room was down to studs on all the walls but two.  Before anything was done, I had removed the wallpaper border on the walls that we thought would be staying.  The rest was no big deal to leave since we knew it would be ripped out.Removing wallpaper

Joe finished up with the plumbing, and we had our electrician friend Jimmy come over to run the wires for the new outlets. Then we had Dave come and start on the drywall installation.  Joe had left the pipes for the sink and toilet water line exposed so Dave installed the drywall around those. Because it is in the bathroom, we decided to go with the drywall that is mold and water resistant.  Hopefully we’ll never have issues, but we wanted to be safe. Drywall put up on sink wall

Dave also showed me how to do a hot patch that was on the part of the wall that we kept.  Unfortunately, there was a hole there where the toilet paper holder was when we moved in, but that took care of it. I could explain it, but you might have to look it up if you’re really interested, since I wouldn’t do it very well. Hot patch

Double D had the idea for rounded corners on the two that are next to the shower, and I’m so glad he did.  I had never seen these done before. The plastic looks just like a regular corner piece, but it’s rounded, which softens everything a bit. Rounded corner for drywall

Once the drywall was up, Dave started taping and mudding.  It went much faster than I thought it would, probably because we would have still been working on it.  Looking good so far!Drywall mudded on sink wallTaped and mudded

Once the mudding and taping was done, Double D and I were left to paint a primer coat on the new drywall.  Because drywall soaks up the paint, the primer helps stop that, and save you a bit of money on more paint. I personally had never done this step, but Dave recommended it.  I have to say it was a much easier process to paint the room after the primer. Primer coat on drywall

And finally we were at the actual painting part.  It was finally beginning to look to like a real room, not a construction zone, and I was so excited to get here. We went with Benjamin Moore’s Palladian Blue.  In the below picture, we still only had one light bulb, and it was a really pretty blue.  With the new light, it actually looks like a green color most of the time, except in the early morning hours when the sun is not full force from the south yet. Either way, I actually love how it looks on the wall, and am super happy. Painted Drywall Palladian Blue

Because I like to see things as before and after, I’m including this picture of one wall for the whole process from new drywall to painted. I guess I didn’t get a picture of what it was down to studs, or I would have added that to the beginning of this one.Drywall up and painted

Also, I had to add a picture of how the rounded corner came out.  I love the way they both look, just because they seem to add a touch of elegance to the room. Very cool! We owe a big thanks to Dave, who made this part of the remodel seem like a breeze! Finished Rounded corner

Thanks for looking! More posts are in the works, so stop by again sometime.

Sarah

Check out the other Bathroom Renovation posts:

Bathroom Remodel: Part 1, Demo

Bathroom Remodel: Part 2, Shower Installation

Bathroom Remodel: Part 4, Luxury Vinyl Tile Flooring

Bathroom Remodel: Part 5, DIY Exposed Conduit Light Fixture

Linking up with Rustic and Refined, Between Naps on the Porch, Domestically Speaking, Home Stories A-Z, and A Stroll Thru Life:

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